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Christopher Jordan Dorner, the fired Los Angeles Police Department Officer wanted for the revenge slayings of a college basketball coach and her fiance in Irvine and the killing of a Riverside police officer, as well as the shootings of two other officers.
Christopher Jordan Dorner, the fired Los Angeles Police Department Officer wanted for the revenge slayings of a college basketball coach and her fianc...

Actor Charlie Sheen makes plea to Dorner to call him; Dorner's truck abandoned after axle broke, reports say


Thursday, February 7th, 2013
Issue 06, Volume 17.


SAN DIEGO - Actor Charlie Sheen, mentioned in the angry manifesto posted by an accused cop killer, has posted an internet plea for the man to call him.

The video, posted at TMZ.com, has Sheen addressing a camera. "Christopher Dorner? Charlie Sheen," the actor says. "You mentioned me in your manifesto, so thank you for you kind words.

"I am urging you to call me. Let's figure out together how to end this thing."

In the manifesto, the former LAPD officer called Sheen "effin' awesome."


SAN DIEGO - A former Los Angeles police officer suspected of three murders abandoned his truck when its axle broke, leading to a door-to-door search at Big Bear that entered its third day today, two TV networks reported.

And CNN reported that police believe Dorner may have as many as 30 weapons with him now. Other weapons were burned inside the truck as it was set on fire at about 8:20 a.m. Thursday.

CBS and CNN both quoted inside sources, and reported that an arsenal of weaponry and survival gear was found inside the burned-out pickup truck that Christopher Jordan Dorner apparently torched near the Big Bear Ski Area on Thursday morning.

Law enforcement officers in San Diego County and across the Southwest remained on heightened alert for a third consecutive day today. But police and the sheriff's office reported no new possible sightings of Dorner, 33, who was fired by the Los Angeles Police Department five years ago.

At San Ysidro early today, only two traffic lanes were open on southbound Interstate 5 at the Mexican border.

According to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection spokeswoman, agents were exercising additional vigilance in southbound inspections in Southern California, and southbound travelers into Mexico could experience delays.

In Los Angeles, police Chief Charlie Beck refused to make any comments as he attended a City Hall prayer breakfast.

Both the San Diego Police Department and the San Diego County Sheriff's Department were maintaining regular staffing levels as authorities in the Big Bear area resumed their search.

Dorner, a former Navy reservist, had been staying at at the Navy Base Point Loma and had tried to steal a boat during his crime spree, police believed.

Dorner vowed online Monday to kill named and unnamed LAPD officers and their families to avenge what he described as a campaign of unfair treatment that cost him his career. Dorner also allegedly threatened to target officers from other agencies if they tried to halt his vendetta.

Dorner was suspected in the slayings of 28-year-old Monica Quan and her finance, 27-year-old Keith Lawrence, who were found shot to death Sunday night in a parked car in Irvine, and the ambush killing of a Riverside police officer four days later.

Quan was the daughter of a now-retired LAPD captain who represented Dorner at the Board of Rights hearing that led to his firing, and the killings were carried out in an act of revenge outlined in the lengthy manifesto, which blames Quan's father for losing his job.

"We're at regular staffing at this point, but we have other special units that are monitoring what's going on and if things come up, they'll be able to respond, but there's nothing at this point because we don't have any information about him bring in this area," said sheriff's Lt. Scott Amos.

San Diego police Sgt. Ray Battrick said SDPD personnel were being updated with any new information that came up in the investigation into what he said was "a dangerous individual."

On Friday, law enforcement personnel across San Diego County investigated numerous unfounded reports of Dorner sightings.

Law enforcement agencies throughout San Diego County went on high alert Thursday after Dorner's LAPD badge and identification were found near Lindbergh Field and a possible sighting of the suspect was reported at Navy Gateway Inn and Suites, where he had stayed on Tuesday. The hotel went into lockdown status for several hours amid the manhunt.

By mid-afternoon Thursday, the search had moved onto San Bernardino County after Dorner's pickup truck was found burning just off a forest road in Big Bear.

All the areas where someone could have walked away from the truck were being searched, Cindy Bachman, a spokeswoman for the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department said.

Anyone spotting Dorner, whose last known address is in La Palma, should consider him armed and "extremely dangerous" and should not approach or try contacting him but instead call 911 immediately, police said. A tip line has been established and can be reached at (949) 724-7192.


Massive manhunt continues, Border Patrol intensifies lookout; two women shot during search of ex-cop triple-murder suspect

RIVERSIDE - Storm clouds parted and the intensive search for a revenge-minded cop-killer continued today from the snowy mountains of Big Bear to the Mexican border, and beyond.

San Bernardino County sheriff's deputies continued to comb the newly- fallen snow around the Big Bear ski areas, the area where Christopher Jordan Dorner may have abandoned his truck and set it afire. But no new leads have been disclosed.

SWAT teams from across Southern California remained in the mountain resort for a third day, in some cases breaking into cabins that are routinely locked up for winter, as they sought Dorner.

The Big Bear Lake Resort Association reassured the public that "a strong police presence remains in Big Bear around the clock," and in a news release noted that ski areas and other attractions were open. Brilliant sunshine and a foot of fresh snow were reported.

At San Diego, a massive traffic jam developed at the Mexican border today, where only two of the five southbound lanes were open. Officers wearing body armor and cradling rifles were photographed watching traffic heading through the unusual bottleneck at the Mexican border.

But police and federal agents would not confirm if the unusual police tactics at the border was a result of the manhunt for Dorner at the busiest border crossing in the world.

Los Angeles police Chief Charlie Beck refused to make any comments about the manhunt, as he attended a City Hall prayer breakfast.

Police followed up leads across the Southland today, and suburban police reported that they had been assisting LAPD guard details at police officers' homes across the region. Dorner's threats, listed on an internet manifesto, included promises to kill police and their family members at their homes.

But police and the sheriff's office revealed no new solid clues or possible sightings of Dorner, 33, who was fired by the Los Angeles Police Department five years ago.

In San Diego, both police and the Sheriff's Department were maintaining regular staffing levels, spokespersons told City News Service. A Biorder Patrol SWAT team was at Big Bear, assisting the search there.

Dorner, a former Navy officer, had been staying at at the Navy Base Point Loma and had tried to steal a boat during his crime spree, police believe.

Dorner vowed online Monday to kill named and unnamed LAPD officers and their families to avenge what he described as a campaign of unfair treatment that cost him his career. Dorner also allegedly threatened to target officers from other agencies if they tried to halt his vendetta.

The former Navy reservist suspected in the slayings of 28-year-old Monica Quan and her finance, 27-year-old Keith Lawrence, who were found shot to death Sunday night in a parked car in Irvine, and the ambush killing of a Riverside police officer four days later.

Quan was the daughter of a now-retired LAPD captain who represented Dorner at the Board of Rights hearing that led to his firing, and the killings were carried out in an act of revenge outlined in the lengthy manifesto, which blames Quan's father for losing his job.

"We're at regular staffing at this point, but we have other special units that are monitoring what's going on and if things come up, they'll be able to respond, but there's nothing at this point because we don't have any information about him bring in this area," said sheriff's Lt. Scott Amos.

San Diego police Sgt. Ray Battrick said SDPD personnel were being updated with any new information that came up in the investigation into what he said was "a dangerous individual."

On Friday, law enforcement personnel across San Diego County investigated numerous unfounded reports of Dorner sightings.

Law enforcement agencies throughout San Diego County went on high alert Thursday after Dorner's LAPD badge and identification were found near Lindbergh Field and a possible sighting of the suspect was reported at Navy Gateway Inn and Suites, where he had stayed on Tuesday. The hotel went into lockdown status for several hours amid the manhunt.

By mid-afternoon Friday, the search had moved onto San Bernardino County after Dorner's pickup truck was found burning just off a forest road in Big Bear.

All the areas where someone could have walked away from the truck were being searched, Cindy Bachman, a spokeswoman for the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department said.

Anyone spotting Dorner, whose last known address is in La Palma, should consider him armed and "extremely dangerous" and should not approach or try contacting him but instead call 911 immediately, police said. A tip line has been established and can be reached at (949) 724-7192.


Massive manhunt continues, two women shot during search of ex-cop triple-murder suspect

RIVERSIDE - Although the effort has been scaled back for lack of new leads, a massive manhunt continues today for a fired Los Angeles Police Department officer suspected in the revenge slayings of a college basketball coach and her fiance in Irvine and the ambush killing of a Riverside police officer.

Law enforcement began searched the mountainous Big Bear area in San Bernardino County Thursday, after the pickup truck belonging to Christopher Jordan Dorner was found burning just off a forest road in the area around 2:30 p.m.

San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon told reporters Friday that more than 100 personnel were involved in the search of the Big Bear area, using specialized equipment such as armored personnel carriers equipped with chains to help them navigate the snow-covered roadways.

About 8:45 a.m. in downtown Los Angeles, sheriff's officials locked down the Twin Towers jail in response to a report from a civilian employee saying she saw "an individual outside that resembled suspect Dorner," sheriff's spokesman Steve Whitmore said. Nearby streets were blocked off, and authorities initiated a search.

The Los Angeles Police Department remains on full or modified tactical alert, which extends officers' shifts, nearly continuously since the Thursday morning shootings in Riverside County of three police officers, one of whom died.

Meanwhile, in other areas of the Southland, police were also maintaining security details aimed at protecting colleagues named as targets in a manifesto written and posted online by the 33-year-old suspect on Monday, authorities said.

Norwalk Christian School -- where Dorner wrote that he first experienced racism -- remained closed for a second day Friday as a security precaution.

Authorities are unsure whether Dorner ventured into the rugged terrain in San Bernardino County or if the truck was set ablaze as a diversionary tactic. They said they were not aware of any vehicles being stolen since the burned-out truck was discovered.

Deputies checked the last of roughly 400 vacation homes in the Big Bear area on Friday night for signs of forced entry, according to Cindy Bachman of the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department. Many Big Bear-area schools were closed Friday, but the Bear Mountain ski resort reopened after closing Thursday when the burning truck was found.

Dorner -- a former U.S. Navy reservist whose last known address was in the 4900 block of Sharon Drive in La Palma -- is black, 6 feet tall and weighs 270 pounds.

Anyone encountering him should consider him "armed and extremely dangerous" and should not approach or try contacting him but instead call 911 immediately, police said. A tip line has been established, (949) 724-7192. People can also call Riverside police at (951) 787-7911. Numerous officers have been standing guard outside LAPD headquarters in downtown Los Angeles since Dorner was identified Wednesday night as the suspect in the slayings of 28-year-old Monica Quan and her fiance, 27-year-old Keith Lawrence, who were found shot to death at 9:10 p.m. Sunday in a parked car at 2100 Scholarship in Irvine.

The couple was inside Lawrence's Kia, which was parked at the top of the five-story parking structure of the condominium building where they lived.

According to police, Quan was the daughter of retired LAPD Capt. Randy Quan, who represented Dorner at the Board of Rights hearing that led to his firing, according to Irvine Police Department Chief David Maggard. The killings were allegedly carried out in an act of revenge outlined in the lengthy manifesto, in which Dorner blames Quan's father for losing his job.

Dorner was hired by the LAPD on Feb. 7, 2005, and was fired Sept. 4, 2008, for allegedly making false statements about his training officer, police said.

After Dorner was named as the suspect in the Irvine killings, his gray Nissan Titan pickup truck was spotted around 1:20 a.m. Thursday in the Corona area by a resident who alerted a pair of LAPD officers en route to protect someone named in the manifesto.

The officers were trying to catch up to the vehicle near Interstate 15 and Magnolia Avenue when Dorner allegedly opened fire on them, grazing one officer in the head. The officers returned fire, but Dorner, wearing camouflage fatigues and using a shoulder-held weapon, escaped, police said.

A short time later, Dorner allegedly ambushed two Riverside police officers who were stopped at a red light at Magnolia and Arlington avenues in Riverside, according to Riverside police Lt. Guy Toussaint, who said the two were on "routine patrol" and were not searching for Dorner at the time.

One officer -- a 34-year-old, 11-year veteran of the force -- was killed. The wounded Riverside officer, who is 27 years old, underwent surgery and is expected to fully recover, Riverside police Chief Sergio Diaz said.

Early Thursday morning in Torrance, meanwhile, LAPD and Torrance police officers opened fire in separate shootings about a block apart due to sightings of two trucks matching the description of Dorner's Nissan. In the LAPD shooting, two women delivering newspapers were wounded.

Chief Charlie Beck said they were the victims of mistaken identity. One of them, a 71-year-old woman, was in intensive care with two bullet wounds to her back, the woman's attorney told reporters. the other woman was shot in the hand.

Beck noted that Dorner unsuccessfully tried to steal a boat from a man in San Diego County on Wednesday.

Also in San Diego, police surrounded a military base and hotel in Point Loma on Thursday after receiving a report of a suspect matching Dorner's description being there, but nobody was found.

Dorner posted his manifesto on his Facebook page Monday, saying he didn't mind dying because he already died when he was fired from the LAPD, Maggard said. He wrote that it had been his life's ambition to be an LAPD officer since he served in the police Explorer program as a youth.

"I never had the opportunity to have a family of my own ... (so) I am terminating yours," Dorner wrote.

Dorner's manifesto essentially described his plans to begin a military- style assault against the LAPD, according to Beck.

"I would tell him to turn himself in," the chief said. "This has gone far enough. You know, nobody else needs to die."


More than 100 officers scour mountains in search of ex-cop triple-murder suspect

RIVERSIDE - Braving snowfall and dwindling temperatures, more than 100 law enforcement authorities scoured the mountains near Big Bear today in search of a fired Los Angeles Police Department officer accused in the revenge killings of a college basketball coach and her fiance and the ambush slaying of a Riverside police officer.

Law enforcement began searching the mountainous Big Bear area in San Bernardino County on Thursday, after the pickup truck belonging to 33-year-old Christopher Jordan Dorner was found burning just off a forest road in the area around 2:30 p.m.

According to San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon, sheriff's deputies and police officers were using specialized equipment such as armored personnel carriers equipped with chains to help them navigate the snow-covered roadways.

Sheriff's officials said the search would continue until Dorner was located or evidence was found indicating he was no longer in the Big Bear area. Officials said some tracks were found during the search effort, but investigators determined they did not belong to Dorner.

Meanwhile, authorities searched Dorner's mother's home in La Palma, where Dorner was believed to have either been staying or recently visited prior to the outbreak of violence. There was no word on what investigators found at the home.

The lingering search continued to leave law enforcement authorities on edge. The Twin Towers jail complex in downtown Los Angeles was locked down briefly this morning when a worker reported seeing "an individual outside that resembled suspect Dorner," sheriff's spokesman Steve Whitmore said. Nearby streets were blocked off, but there was no sign of the suspect.

Some media outlets reported that Dorner's ex-wife works at the Twin Towers jail.

The LAPD has been on full tactical alert, which extends officers' shifts, nearly continuously since the Thursday morning shootings in Riverside County of three police officers, one of whom was killed.

The tactical alert was lifted about 7:30 this morning, and reactivated about three hours later, the LAPD reported.

In other areas of the Southland, police were also maintaining security details aimed at protecting colleagues named as targets in a manifesto that authorities said was written and posted online by the suspect on Monday.

Norwalk Christian School -- where the manifesto contended that Dorner first experienced racism in the first grade -- remained closed for a second day as a security precaution.

Authorities are unsure if Dorner ventured into the rugged terrain in San Bernardino County or if the truck was set ablaze as a diversionary tactic. They said they were not aware of any vehicle having been stolen since the burned-out truck was discovered.

Deputies were expected to finish checking the roughly 400 vacation homes in the Big Bear area by nightfall, and so far, there were no signs of forced entry at any of them, according to Cindy Bachman of the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department. Many Big Bear-area schools were closed today, but the Bear Mountain ski resort reopened.

Dorner -- a U.S. Navy reservist whose last known address was in the 4900 block of Sharon Drive in La Palma -- is black, 6 feet tall and weighs 270 pounds.

Anyone encountering him should consider him "armed and extremely dangerous" and should not approach or try contacting him but instead call 911 immediately, police said. A tip line has been established, (949) 724-7192. People can also call Riverside police at (951) 787-7911.

Numerous officers have been standing guard outside LAPD headquarters in downtown Los Angeles since Dorner was identified Wednesday night as the suspect in the slayings of 28-year-old Monica Quan and her fiance, 27-year-old Keith Lawrence, who were found shot to death at 9:10 p.m. Sunday in a parked car at 2100 Scholarship in Irvine.

The couple was inside Lawrence's Kia, which was parked at the top of the five-story parking structure of the condominium building where they lived.

According to police, Quan was the daughter of a retired LAPD captain who represented Dorner at the Board of Rights hearing that led to his firing, and the killings were allegedly carried out in an act of revenge outlined in the lengthy manifesto, in which Dorner blames Quan's father for losing his job.

Dorner was hired by the LAPD on Feb. 7, 2005, and was fired Sept. 4, 2008, for allegedly making false statements about his training officer, police said.

After Dorner was named as the suspect in the Irvine killings, his gray Nissan Titan pickup truck was spotted around 1:20 a.m. Thursday in the Corona area by a resident who alerted a pair of LAPD officers en route to protect someone named in the manifesto.

The officers were trying to catch up to the vehicle near Interstate 15 and Magnolia Avenue when Dorner allegedly opened fire on them, grazing one officer in the head. The officers returned fire, but Dorner, wearing camouflage fatigues and using a shoulder-held weapon, escaped, police said.

A short time later, Dorner allegedly ambushed two Riverside police officers who were stopped at a red light at Magnolia and Arlington avenues in Riverside, according to Riverside police Lt. Guy Toussaint, who said the two were on "routine patrol" and were not searching for Dorner at the time.

One officer -- a 34-year-old, 11-year veteran of the force -- was killed. The wounded Riverside officer, who is 27 years old, underwent surgery and is expected to fully recover, Riverside police Chief Sergio Diaz said.

Early Thursday morning in Torrance, meanwhile, LAPD and Torrance police officers opened fire in separate shootings about a block apart due to sightings of two trucks matching the description of Dorner's Nissan. In the LAPD shooting, two women delivering newspapers were wounded.

Chief Charlie Beck said they were the victims of mistaken identity. One of them, a 71-year-old woman, was in intensive care with two bullet wounds to her back, the woman's attorney told reporters. the other woman was shot in the hand.

Beck noted that Dorner unsuccessfully tried to steal a boat from a man in San Diego County on Wednesday.

Also in San Diego, police surrounded a military base and hotel in Point Loma on Thursday after receiving a report of a suspect matching Dorner, but nobody was found.

In the LAPD hearing that resulted in his termination, Dorner was represented by then-LAPD Capt. Randy Quan, the father of Monica Quan, according to Irvine Police Department Chief David Maggard.

Dorner posted his manifesto online Monday, saying he didn't mind dying because he already died when he was fired from the LAPD, Maggard said. He wrote that it had been his life's ambition to be an LAPD officer since he served in the police Explorer program, and he blamed Quan for his firing.

"I never had the opportunity to have a family of my own ... (so) I am terminating yours," according to the manifesto.

Dorner's manifesto essentially described his plans to begin a military- style assault against the LAPD, according to Beck.


Police on heightened alert for ex-cop triple-murder suspect

SOUTHERN CALIF - San Diego police were on heighten alert for the second consecutive day today as law enforcement throughout Southern California searched for a fired Los Angeles Police Department officer suspected in the revenge slayings of a college basketball coach and her finance in Irvine and the ambush killing of a Riverside police officer.

The massive manhunt for Christopher Jordan Dorner focused on San Diego much of the day Thursday after his LAPD badge and identification were found near Lindbergh Field and a possible sighting of the suspect was reported at Navy Gateway Inn and Suites.

The hotel sits next to the Naval Base Point Loma Naval Mine and Anti- Submarine Warfare complex, which was placed on lockdown for several hours amid the manhunt. By mid-afternoon, the search moved onto San Bernardino County after Dorner's pickup was found burning just off a forest road in Big Bear.

Police continued to comb the mountainous Big Bear area today and were also maintaining security details aimed at protecting colleagues named as targets in a manifesto written and posted online by the suspect, authorities said.

All the areas where someone could have walked away from the truck were being searched by ground and the hunt was continuing throughout into early today, said Cindy Bachman of the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department.

A winter storm was expected to bring up to four inches of snow to the Big Bear area today, according to the National Weather Service, but it was unclear if Dorner has ventured into the rugged terrain or if the truck was set ablaze as a feint. Bachman said she was not aware of any vehicle having been stolen since the burned out truck was discovered.

Deputies have gone to about half of the 400 vacation homes in the area and there were no signs of forced entry at any of them, Bachman said late Thursday. The pickup truck discovery led to the lockdown of Big Bear-area schools and the closure of the Bear Mountain ski resort, but the schools and resort were to be open today, she said.

Dorner -- a U.S. Navy reservist whose last known address was in the 4900 block of Sharon Drive in La Palma -- is black, 6 feet tall and weighs 270 pounds. Advertisement
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Anyone encountering him should consider him "armed and extremely dangerous" and should not approach or try contacting him but instead call 911 immediately, police said. A tip line has been established, (949) 724-7192. People can also call Riverside police at (951) 787-7911.

The LAPD has been on a full tactical alert, which extends officers' shifts, since shortly after the Thursday morning shootings in Riverside County of three police officers, one of whom was killed, said Officer Christopher No of the LAPD's Media Relations Section.

Numerous officers have been standing guard outside LAPD headquarters in downtown Los Angeles since Dorner, 33, was identified Wednesday night as the suspect in the slayings of 28-year-old Monica Quan and her finance, 27-year-old Keith Lawrence, who were found shot to death at 9:10 p.m. Sunday in a parked car at 2100 Scholarship in Irvine.

The couple was inside Lawrence's Kia, which was parked at the top of the five-story parking structure of the building where they lived.

According to police, Quan was the daughter of a retired LAPD captain who represented Dorner at the Board of Rights hearing that led to his firing, and the killings were carried out in an act of revenge outlined in the lengthy manifesto, which blames Quan's father for losing his job.

Dorner was hired by the LAPD on Feb. 7, 2005, and he was fired Sept. 4, 2008, for allegedly making false statements about his training officer, police said.

After Dorner was named as the suspect in the Irvine killings, his gray Nissan Titan pickup truck was spotted around 1:20 a.m. Thursday in the Corona area by a resident who alerted a pair of LAPD officers en route to protect someone named in the manifesto.

The officers were trying to catch up to the vehicle near Interstate 15 and Magnolia Avenue when Dorner allegedly opened fire on them, grazing one officer in the head. The officers returned fire, but Dorner, wearing camouflage fatigues and using a shoulder-held weapon, escaped, police said.

A short time later, Dorner allegedly opened fire on two Riverside police officers who were stopped at a red light at Magnolia and Arlington avenues in Riverside, according to Riverside police Lt. Guy Toussaint, who said the two were on "routine patrol" and were not searching for Dorner at the time.

One officer -- a 34-year-old, 11-year veteran of the force -- was killed. The wounded Riverside officer, who is 27 years old, underwent surgery and is expected to fully recover, Riverside police Chief Sergio Diaz said.

Early Thursday morning in Torrance, meanwhile, LAPD and Torrance police officers opened fire in separate shootings about a block apart at two trucks matching the description of Dorner's Nissan. In the LAPD shooting, two women delivering newspapers were wounded.

Los Angeles police Chief Charlie Beck said they were the victims of mistaken identity. One of them, a 71-year-old woman, was in intensive care with two bullet wounds to her back, the woman's attorney told reporters.

Beck noted that Dorner unsuccessfully tried to steal a boat from a man in San Diego County on Wednesday.

Also in San Diego, police surrounded a military base and hotel in Point Loma after receiving a report of a suspect matching Dorner, but nobody was found.

In the LAPD hearing that resulted in his termination, Dorner was represented by then-LAPD Capt. Randy Quan, the father of Monica Quan, according to Irvine Police Department Chief David Maggard.

Dorner posted his manifesto online Monday, saying he didn't mind dying because he already died when he was fired from the LAPD, Maggard said. He wrote that it had been his life's ambition to be an LAPD officer since he served in the police Explorer program, and he blamed Quan for his firing.

"I never had the opportunity to have a family of my own ... (so) I am terminating yours," Dorner wrote to Randy Quan.

Dorner's manifesto essentially described his plans to begin a military- style assault against the LAPD.

"I would tell him to turn himself in," Beck said. "This has gone far enough. You know, nobody else needs to die."


Helicopters Search Big Bear For Ex-Cop Triple-Murder Suspect

RIVERSIDE - Three law enforcement helicopters flew above the Big Bear area tonight in search of the fired Los Angeles Police Department officer suspected in the revenge slayings of a college basketball coach and her finance in Irvine and the early morning ambush killing of a Riverside police officer.

The truck belonging to Christopher Jordan Dorner was found burning just off a forest road in the area late today, authorities said.

All the areas where someone could have walked away from the truck were being searched by ground, Cindy Bachman of the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department said at a 9 p.m. news conference.

"I'm not aware of any evidence found near the truck, nor am I aware of any explosives," Bachman said.

Bachman said she was not aware of any vehicle having been stolen since the burned out truck was discovered.

Deputies have gone to about half of the 400 vacation homes in the area and there were no signs of forced entry at any of them, Bachman said.

The San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department provided two of the helicopters used in the search, while the other came from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.

Dorner, 33, was identified Wednesday night as the suspect in the slayings of 28-year-old Monica Quan and her finance, 27-year-old Keith Lawrence, who were found shot to death at 9:10 p.m. Sunday in a parked car at 2100 Scholarship in Irvine.

They were inside Lawrence's Kia, which was parked at the top of the five- story parking structure for the building where they lived.

According to police, Quan was the daughter of a retired LAPD captain who represented Dorner at the Board of Rights hearing that led to his firing, and the killings were carried out in an act of revenge outlined in a lengthy manifesto Dorner posted online -- blaming Quan's father for losing his job.

During the search, Dorner's gray Nissan Titan pickup truck was spotted around 1:20 a.m. in the Corona area by a resident who alerted a pair of LAPD officers en route to protect somebody named in Dorner's manifesto.

The officers were trying to catch up to the vehicle near Interstate 15 and Magnolia Avenue when Dorner allegedly opened fire on them, grazing one officer in the head. The officers returned fire, but Dorner escaped.

Dorner was described as wearing camouflage fatigues and using a shoulder- held weapon.

A short time later, Dorner opened fire on two Riverside police officers who were stopped at a red light at Magnolia and Arlington avenues, according to Riverside police Lt. Guy Toussaint, adding that the two were on "routine patrol" and were not searching for Dorner at the time.

One of the officers -- a 34-year-old, 11-year veteran of the force -- was killed. The wounded Riverside officer, who is 27 years old, underwent surgery and is expected to fully recover, Riverside police Chief Sergio Diaz said.

"Anne and I were shocked and saddened to learn of the senseless attack on a Riverside police officer that resulted in his death this morning," Gov. Jerry Brown said.

"We join his family, friends, co-workers and the Riverside community in mourning his death and in honoring his sacrifice."

Brown ordered Capitol flags to be flown at half-staff in honor of the officer.

Dorner -- a U.S. Navy reservist whose last known address was in the 4900 block of Sharon Drive in La Palma -- is black, 6 feet tall and weighs 270 pounds.

At about 2:30 p.m., a truck found burning near a forest road in the Big Bear area was confirmed as the Nissan being used by Dorner, according to San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon.

That discovery led to a door-to-door search of the area, the lockdown of Big Bear-area schools and closure of the Bear Mountain ski resort.

Anyone encountering Dorner should consider him "armed and extremely dangerous" and should not approach or try contacting him but instead call 911 immediately, police said. A tip line has been established, (949) 724-7192. People can also call Riverside police at (951) 787-7911.

The search for Dorner has stretched across a five-county area, beginning in Orange County where the first two killings occurred. Overnight in Torrance, LAPD and Torrance police officers opened fire in separate shootings about a block apart at two trucks matching the description of Dorner's Nissan.

In the LAPD shooting, two people delivering newspapers were wounded.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said they were the victims of mistaken identity, but both of them suffered minor injuries.

Beck noted that Dorner unsuccessfully tried to steal a boat from a man in San Diego County on Wednesday.

Also in San Diego, police surrounded a military base and hotel in Point Loma after receiving a report of a suspect matching Dorner, but nobody was found.

In the LAPD board-of-rights hearing that resulted in his termination, Dorner was represented by then-LAPD Capt. Randy Quan, the father of Monica Quan, according to Irvine Police Department Chief David Maggard.

Dorner posted a multi-page manifesto online Monday, saying he didn't mind dying because he already died when he was fired from the LAPD, Maggard said. He wrote that it had been his life's ambition to be an LAPD officer since he served in the Explorer program, and he blamed Quan for his firing.

"I never had the opportunity to have a family of my own ... (so) I am terminating yours," Dorner wrote to Randy Quan.

Dorner's manifesto included various other names of people he was targeting, and essentially described his plans to begin a military-style assault against the LAPD.

The LAPD's elite Metropolitan squad was sent to protect people mentioned in Dorner's manifesto. Their names were not released.

Dorner was hired by the LAPD eight years ago today, and he was fired Sept. 4, 2008, for allegedly making false statements about his training officer.

Monica Quan was in her second season as an assistant coach for the Cal State Fullerton women's basketball team after holding a similar position at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks.

She was a star athlete at Walnut High School, then played at Cal State Long Beach from 2003-05 before transferring to Concordia University, where she graduated in 2007 with a degree in exercise and sports science. She received a master's degree from Concordia in 2009.

Lawrence, who graduated from the Ventura County Sheriff's Academy, was working as a patrol officer at USC's Department of Public Safety. He joined the department in August, said Carl Marziali, USC's assistant vice president of media relations.

The couple met while at Concordia University in Irvine, where they both played basketball. Lawrence was seeking a career in law enforcement, which made him a good match for Monica Quan because her father was an LAPD officer, friends said.

"I would tell him (Dorner) to turn himself in," Beck said. "This has gone far enough. You know, nobody else needs to die."


Massive manhunt continues for ex-cop triple-murder suspect

SOUTHERN CALIF. - Authorities mounted intensive manhunts in San Diego, Big Bear, and statewide today for a one-time Los Angeles police officer suspected of murdering three people, including a policeman, in the Irvine and Riverside areas while on a quest for revenge against despised former rivals in law enforcement.

Police and military personnel locked down and searched Naval Base Point Loma and a motel on the grounds of the station this morning after someone reported seeing a man matching the description of 33-year-old Christopher

Jordan Dorner in the area.

No suspect was found, and authorities decided the sighting likely was not valid, though Dorner apparently had stayed at the inn earlier in the week, SDPD Capt. Terry McManus told reporters during a midday briefing.

"We are still vigorously working with all authorities to get him into custody," McManus said.

This afternoon, Dorner's 2005 Nissan Titan pickup truck was found abandoned and burning in Big Bear, according to the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department. Heavily armed officers then began combing surrounding wooded terrain and going door-to-door in the area, officials said.

In San Diego, authorities had begun actively looking for the suspect about 2:30 this morning, after an LAPD badge and wallet containing his identification were found along Harbor Drive, near Lindbergh Field.

Roughly four hours earlier, a gun-toting man matching Dorner's description boarded a 47-foot yacht docked off Qualtrough Street in the Shelter Island area, tied up an 81-year-old occupant and made a failed attempt to pull

the vessel out of its slip. The intruder then stole some things from the man and left.

Dorner, a former Navy reservist, is believed to have carried out shootings this morning in Corona and Riverside. In the latter assault, one police officer was killed and another wounded in what authorities described as an ambush.

The suspect also is wanted for the apparent revenge slayings of an Irvine couple over the weekend.

Investigators say Dorner posted a rambling manifesto online Monday, saying he didn't mind losing his life because he already had "died" when he was fired from the Los Angeles Police Department for purportedly making false statements about his training officer.

He blamed his termination on a department official whose daughter, Cal State Fullerton assistant women's basketball coach Monica Quan, 28, was killed Sunday along with her fiance, 27-year-old Keith Lawrence, a police officer with the University of Southern California Department of Public Safety.

During a hearing that resulted in his 2008 termination, Dorner was represented by then-Capt. Randy Quan. In his online posting, Dorner accused Quan, who has since retired from the department, of derailing his life's ambition to be an LAPD officer.

"I never had the opportunity to have a family of my own ... (so) I am terminating yours," Dorner wrote.

In the bitter Facebook diatribe, the ex-officer vowed to target a number of named LAPD personnel along with the rest of the agency's rank and file accusing them collectively of perpetuating a culture of misconduct and corruption.

The department's elite Metropolitan squad was sent to protect people mentioned in the manifesto.

The San Diego police captain urged anyone spotting Dorner -- photos of whom have been broadcast frequently by local and national television news outlets -- to stay well away from him and make an immediate emergency call.

"We ask the community not to get involved beyond dialing 911," McManus said.


(previous version)

Officer slain during ex-LAPD officer manhunt; Dorner suspected of revenge slayings of couple killed in Irvine

RIVERSIDE - A law enforcement dragnet stretched across Southern California today as authorities hunted a fired Los Angeles Police Department officer suspected in the revenge slayings of a college basketball coach and her fiance in Irvine and the early morning ambush killing of a Riverside police officer.

Christopher Jordan Dorner, 33, was identified Wednesday night as a suspect in the slayings of 28-year-old Monica Quan and her fiance, 27-year-old Keith Lawrence, who were found shot to death at 9:10 p.m. Sunday in a parked

car at 2100 Scholarship in Irvine. They were inside Lawrence's Kia, which was parked at the top of the five-story parking structure for the building where they lived.

According to police, Quan was the daughter of a retired LAPD captain who represented Dorner at the Board of Rights hearing that led to his firing, and the killings were carried out in an act of revenge outlined in a lengthy

manifesto Dorner posted online -- blaming Quan's father for losing his job.

As police fanned out across the Southland, two LAPD officers who were in Corona around 1:20 a.m. en route to protecting someone mentioned in Dorner's manifesto were approached by a resident who reported seeing a person matching Dorner's description.

"A citizen approached the officers and directed them to a vehicle that matched that of Christopher Dorner's metallic gray Nissan Titan Pickup truck," according to an LAPD statement. The officers saw someone in the truck

resembling Dorner, the truck took off and the officers followed it as it entered I-15, according to police.

"The suspect then opened fire on the officers while they were in their vehicle," police said. The LAPD officers fired back, but "it is unknown if the suspect was injured during the shooting."

One officer suffered a minor graze wound to the head in the shooting near Interstate 15 and Magnolia Avenue. The other was not injured. Dorner was described as wearing camouflage fatigues and using a shoulder-held weapon

during the Corona shootout.

About 20 minutes later, Dorner is believed to have ambushed two Riverside officers while they were stopped at a red light at Magnolia and Arlington avenues, according to Riverside police Lt. Guy Toussaint, adding that the two were on "routine patrol" and were not searching for Dorner at the time.

One of the officers -- a 34-year-old, 11-year veteran of the force -- was killed. The wounded Riverside officer, who is 27 years old, underwent surgery and is expected to fully recover, Riverside police Chief Sergio Diaz

said.

Dorner -- a U.S. Navy reservist whose last known address was in the 4900 block of Sharon Drive in La Palma -- is black, 6 feet tall and weighs 270 pounds. He has been driving a gray 2005 Nissan Titan pickup, California license

plate 7X03191, police said. At a briefing this morning, police said Dorner apparently switched license plates, possibly to a plate with the number 8D83987 or 8D83997.

Anyone encountering Dorner should consider him "armed and extremely dangerous" and should not approach or try contacting him but instead call 911 immediately, police said. A tip line has been established, (949) 724-7192.

People can also call Riverside police at (951) 787-7911.

Police in San Diego surrounded a military base and hotel in Point Loma this morning after receiving a report of a suspect matching Dorner, but no suspect was found.

Meanwhile, Los Angeles and Torrance police opened fire in separate shootings about a block apart early this morning when they spotted vehicles matching the description of Dorner's. Two people -- believed to have been delivering newspapers -- were wounded. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said they were the victims of mistaken identity.

Beck noted that Dorner allegedly tried to steal a boat from a man in San Diego County on Wednesday, but was unsuccessful.

In the LAPD board-of-rights hearing that resulted in his termination, Dorner was represented by then-LAPD Capt. Randy Quan, the father of Monica Quan, according to Irvine Police Department Chief David Maggard.

Dorner posted a multi-page manifesto online Monday, saying he didn't mind dying because he already died when he was fired from the LAPD, Maggard said. He wrote that it had been his life's ambition to be an LAPD officer since

he served in the Explorer program, and he blamed Quan for his firing.

"I never had the opportunity to have a family of my own ... (so) I am terminating yours," Dorner wrote to Randy Quan.

The LAPD's elite Metropolitan squad was sent to protect people mentioned in Dorner's manifesto. Their names were not released.

The LAPD issued a statement Wednesday saying it was taking the threats "very seriously," implementing "all measures possible to ensure the safety of our LAPD personnel, their families and the Los Angeles community, and will continue to do so until Dorner is apprehended and all threats have been abated."

Dorner worked as a police officer from Feb. 7, 2005, until Sept. 4, 2008, "when his employment was terminated," police said. He was fired for allegedly making false statements about his training officer.

Monica Quan was in her second season as an assistant coach for the Cal State Fullerton women's basketball team after holding a similar position at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks.

The couple met while at Concordia University in Irvine, where they both played basketball. Lawrence was seeking a career in law enforcement, which made him a good match for Monica Quan because her father was an LAPD officer,

friends said.

Lawrence, who graduated from the Ventura County Sheriff's Academy, was working as a patrol officer at USC's Department of Public Safety. He joined the department in August, said Carl Marziali, USC's assistant vice president of

media relations.

Monica Quan was a star athlete at Walnut High School, then played at Cal State Long Beach from 2003-05 before transferring to Concordia University, where she graduated in 2007 with a degree in exercise and sports science. She

received a master's degree from Concordia in 2009.

"I would tell him (Dorner) to turn himself in," Beck said. "This has gone far enough. You know, nobody else needs to die."


Previous story, 8 a.m.

RIVERSIDE - A Riverside police officer was shot to death today and one was wounded by a gunman believed to Christopher Jordan Dorner, the fired Los Angeles Police Department Officer wanted for the revenge slayings of a college basketball coach and her fiance in Irvine, police said.

The gunman, who fled after shooting, ambushed the two Riverside officers while they were stopped at a red light, said Riverside police Lt. Guy Toussaint, adding that the two were on patrol and not searching for Dorner.

The wounded Riverside officer was undergoing surgery this morning, Toussaint said.

Before the Riverside shooting, a shootout in Corona also believed to have involved Dorner left a Los Angeles police officer with a graze wound but his partner was not hurt, police said. The officer is assigned to the Los Angeles Police Department's Newton Station, said Newton Station Sgt. Ike Ornelas.

Dorner, a U.S. Navy reservist whose last known address was in the 4900 block of Sharon Drive in La Palma, was represented in the hearing that resulted in his firing by Randy Quan, the father of Monica Quan, slain with Keith Lawrence, Irvine Police Department Chief David Maggard said at a news conference Wednesday night.

Dorner, 33, posted a multi-page manifesto online Monday, saying he didn't mind dying because he already died when he was fired from the LAPD, Maggard said.

He wrote that it had been his life's ambition to be an LAPD officer since he served in the Explorer program, and he blamed Randy Quan, a retired Los Angeles Police Department officer, for his firing.

"I never had the opportunity to have a family of my own ... (so) I am terminating yours," Dorner wrote to Randy Quan.

The LAPD's elite Metropolitan squad was sent to protect people mentioned in Dorner's manifesto.

The LAPD issued a statement Wednesday saying it was taking the threats "very seriously," implementing "all measures possible to ensure the safety of our LAPD personnel, their families and the Los Angeles community, and will continue to do so until Dorner is apprehended and all threats have been abated."

Dorner worked as a police officer from Feb. 7, 2005 until Sept. 4, 2008, "when his employment was terminated," police said. He was fired for allegedly making false statements about his training officer.

Dorner is black, 6 feet tall and weighs 270 pounds. He has been driving a blue 2005 Nissan Titan pickup, California license plate 7X03191, Maggard said.

Anyone encountering Dorner should consider him "armed and extremely dangerous" and should not approach or try contacting him but instead call 911 immediately, police said.

A tip line has been established, (949) 724-7192.

Police who received a call at 9:10 p.m. Sunday about a person slumped over in a parked car at 2100 Scholarship found the recently engaged Quan and Lawrence dead in Lawrence's Kia, which was parked at the top of the five-story structure for the building where they lived.

There was no evidence Lawrence and 28-year-old Monica Quan were being robbed, said Irvine police Lt. Julia Engen, who noted that the high-density residential community is highly secure with key card access only.

Irvine had two slayings in both 2011 and 2012, according to Engen, who said overall violent crime is at "historic lows" in the city.

Monica Quan was in her second season as an assistant coach for the Cal State Fullerton women's basketball team after holding a similar position at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks.

The couple met while at Concordia University in Irvine, where they both played basketball. Lawrence was seeking a career in law enforcement, which made him a good match for Monica Quan because her father was an LAPD officer, friends said.

The 27-year-old Lawrence, who graduated from the Ventura County Sheriff's Academy, was working as a patrol officer at USC's Department of Public Safety. He joined the department in August, said Carl Marziali, USC's assistant vice president of media relations.

Monica Quan was a star athlete at Walnut High School, then played at Cal State Long Beach from 2003-05 before transferring to Concordia University, where she graduated in 2007 with a degree in exercise and sports science. She received a master's degree from Concordia in 2009.

Autopsies on the bodies of Lawrence and Monica Quan were completed Tuesday and Wednesday, respectively, said Jim Amormino of the Orange County Sheriff's Department.

"The coroner determined that both died of multiple gunshot wounds," Amormino said. "No further information will be released at this time."

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2013/02/manhunt-underway-ex-lapd-officer-shooting-3-cops.html


 

28 comments

Comment Profile ImageBigwody
Comment #1 | Thursday, Feb 7, 2013 at 2:15 pm
His manifesto : http://content.clearchannel.com/cc-common/mlib/616/02/616_1360213161.pdf
Comment Profile ImageAverage Joe
Comment #2 | Thursday, Feb 7, 2013 at 2:28 pm
Read his manifesto, he is targeting specific people and police in general, regular folks don't need to worry about getting shot by anyone but the cops. The police have already shot up the wrong vehicle, TWICE now, in an effort to silence this guy. I guess that is what happens when a cop crosses the blue wall of silence and blows the whistle on corruption. Tragic. http://scoot.net/gallery/bbs/dornergif.gif
Comment Profile Imageanonymous
Comment #3 | Friday, Feb 8, 2013 at 1:30 am
Copland 2
Comment Profile ImagePessimistic
Comment #4 | Friday, Feb 8, 2013 at 6:00 am
"blows the whistle on corruption"... LMAO! Is there any, somewhere, within every organization? Yes, probably. Especially in an agency the size of LAPD. But, it's minor in nature yet always exaggerated by those who perceive they have been wronged by the system. The system works in cleaning itself out, just like what happened to this guy. Get over yourself, you are not the 'Average Joe'. You do not speak for 80+% of us that truly are.

This guy is nothing more than a serious nut job, with a violent streak dating back to the 1st grade (written in his own words) that fell through the cracks and should never have been hired as a cop in the first place! I have no doubt that they fired him for GOOD CAUSE; especially when he readily admits in his little psychotic diatribe that his own mother and sister have disowned him over whatever REALLY took place during his measly few years as a LAPD officer!!!!!!! Think about it! Read it, slowly if necessary. That just wouldn't happen if his side of the story had even an ounce of truth. They, of all people, would know this man's true character and mental state. They were /are probably afraid to death of him. Oh, yes, we can dissect his little manifesto to pieces, bu the bottom line is that this guy is unstable, a danger to everyone and is seriously WHACKED!
Comment Profile Imagegrunt
Comment #5 | Friday, Feb 8, 2013 at 8:20 am
If most of his manifesto, the portions concerning his treatment after exposing undue use of force and the coverup and promotions following are true, we as citizens have more to fear from the police than him. However, IF is a mighty big word.
Comment Profile ImageCurious
Comment #6 | Friday, Feb 8, 2013 at 10:28 am
I have one question: How did this guy EVER pass his psych evaluation and get hired as a cop in the first place?
Comment Profile ImageIris
Comment #7 | Friday, Feb 8, 2013 at 11:01 am
Average Joe, right on the mark. My opinion is just mine but I totally agree with that comment!
Comment Profile Image@Curious
Comment #8 | Friday, Feb 8, 2013 at 11:03 am
This X-Cop was normal. The injustice and cover up pushed him over the edge, it's obvious. I mean, they took away his livelihood and tarnished his name. He snapped out. Bad deal, all the way around. We live in a sick sick world. I pray for for everyone.
Comment Profile ImageCurious
Comment #9 | Friday, Feb 8, 2013 at 1:36 pm
Re Comment#8: Baloney. Lots of people have been the victims of injustice and have had their names tarnished for no good reason, yet they haven't started killing innocent people because of it, unless, they were sick individuals to begin with. This poor man had issues long before he joined the LAPD. His so called manifesto is the product of a sick and troubled mind. There is a lot of injustice in the world, we only have his ramblings as "proof" he was treated badly. As you said the world we live in is sick. I too pray for all involved.
Comment Profile ImageRobocop
Comment #10 | Friday, Feb 8, 2013 at 2:06 pm
I hope that if he ever gets captured, they turn him into a Robo-Cop so he can go back to being a good guy and save the earth. By the way.... is it only me that notice that he only likes to work out his arms?
Comment Profile Image@Curious
Comment #11 | Friday, Feb 8, 2013 at 3:28 pm
I never said it was a good reason. I said the guy snapped out. Let me take away, your livelihood and ruin you. Let's see how you react to it. I bet you don't sit there an say thank you "O Gee Willy" thank you. And smile and dance in the streets. Your gonna snap out. What you will do. Who, knows. Only way to find out is to snap you out.
Comment Profile ImageCurious
Comment #12 | Friday, Feb 8, 2013 at 4:53 pm
My life has not been perfect Comment#11. I've had my share of ups and downs, good times and bad times. Stuff happens. Never once, however, has it even occurred to me to pick up a gun and kill innocent people (his captains daughter, her fiance and the cop in Riverside, never did anything to this guy). Someone who "snaps" like he did has issues that have nothing to do with the loss of his job.
Comment Profile ImageResident
Comment #13 | Friday, Feb 8, 2013 at 5:31 pm
He won't have an open casket funeral.

This murderer will reap what he has sown.
Comment Profile ImageResident
Comment #14 | Saturday, Feb 9, 2013 at 1:39 am
Average Joe@ I cannot agree with you more. I worked for a local PD. I saw all kinds of misbehavior that was not only endorsed by the upper level administrators, but also encouraged. You should all read his manifesto. He tells the truth. It made me sick to read it because I could tell that he snapped because of the incredible injustice involved with his whistleblowing. This is a guy whose life has been ruined by the LAPD and they know it.
Comment Profile ImageResident # 1
Comment #15 | Saturday, Feb 9, 2013 at 9:27 am
I'll call myself Resdient #1 to distinquish myself from the other person who has chosen to use the same name, at comment 14. Our views are opposite.

This man has shot two civilians, in the back, whio didn't even know him. He has killed a cop in Riverside. He has injured others.

He was on a website that women use to warn others about odd people they have dated. A warning was put out about him there.

He was estranged from his family.

He was married for 1 month, before his wife left him. This was at approximately the same time as he fired from the LAPD.

Guys a nut, pure and simple.

His "Manifesto" is the ramblings of an insane man. The murderer is in favor of gun control! Did you read that? The heavily armed murderer is in favor of gun control! He's nuts.

He rambles on about Michelle Obama's bangs. He tells what celebrities he likes and gives them advice.

He was fired because he lied, and he is killing now because he is a sick killer.


Hey, anyone praising him, how would you like him to show up and shoot you or your children, like he's already done, if you got in his way? Didn't think so.
Comment Continued : The comment above was written from the same location.
Post Continued
Comment Profile ImageResident #1
Comment #16 | Saturday, Feb 9, 2013 at 9:32 am
He is also a big fan of Piers Morgan.

Need I say more?

Should we blame his violence on the public figures he he admires? That is always done.

Well, he's a big fan of the Obamas, Piers Morgan and Anderson Cooper. Draw your own conclusions.
Comment Profile ImagePink
Comment #17 | Saturday, Feb 9, 2013 at 10:02 am
Thank you Resident#1. In this life we have a choice. Darkness or Light. It is obvious which path this man has chosen. He wasn't just some "normal" guy who snapped he was a disaster waiting to happen.
Comment Profile ImagePessimistic
Comment #18 | Saturday, Feb 9, 2013 at 12:39 pm
Do your research people and step away from your biases for a few minutes!

I now understand why this psychopath was able to slip through the cracks while in field training, after his graduation from the academy (very unfortunate he wasn't squashed during the pre-employment background investigation). While he was in patrol field training, only a short period of time, he was called up in the Reserves to go to the Middle East. FSLA laws in this State allowed for his continued employment / job retention (which is fine to protect the worker). But, FLSA also allows for your 'time in service' (tenure) with your employer to continue - NOT to be frozen until your return (NOT good). This deployment allowed for his PROBATIONARY period to conclude / end (instead of resuming upon his return). Upon his return he resumed his field training and he was FAILING. Terminating his employment during probation, which is simple and you have no civil service protections, was not an option, because it no longer existed (he was off probation)! At one point this guy broke down, crying, during his training and requested he be allowed to go back to the academy for more training (and also admitted to some sort of PTSD to his training officer). WTH?! Do we see a problem with this, people?

He is informed he is failing and a package, now required due to Civil Service / union protections, was being put together to terminate him due to not being able to meet standards required for the position.

So he makes allegations regarding his training officer's (who is starting the package) supposed use of excessive force against a transient (vindictive behavior), involving kicks to the head and torso of the transient while already handcuffed. The Internal Affairs investigation reveals from three (3) independent civilian witnesses and an officer from another agency that it did NOT happen and that he LIED. This, lying, was added to the termination package. I was wondering why he was allowed to grieve his termination though a Civil Service hearing and a review by a Superior Court Judge, where the reasons for termination were upheld. Come on people, we all know that a majority of cops (Black, White, whatever) lean 'conservative' in their political thinking, but it's generally the opposite for those on Civil Service commissions (not associated directly with the LAPD) who usually are hell bent on allowing employees to retain their jobs (especially 'minorities'). They all saw this guy could not do the job, was a liar (which destroys a cops credibility to testify in court), and probably had mental issues.

Some of you people can hate on the cops all you want, for whatever bitter reason / grudge you hold, but let's see this for what it is - a DERANGED POS PSYCHOPATH targeting innocent people unrelated to those his demented mind has accused of wrongdoing. That is like you and a co-worker, regardless of your occupation, having a beef and your co-worker goes out and targets your wife and/or children for retribution. Are you okay with that?!

The sooner they put this guy in a body bag the better for all of us!
Comment Profile ImagePink
Comment #19 | Saturday, Feb 9, 2013 at 2:26 pm
Good job Pessimistic. He couldn't cut it as a police officer, and he lied about his supervisor in order to get even with her. Even LAPD Internal Affairs, who like nothing better than whistle blowers and to find police officers guilty of misconduct, ruled against this guy. He was fired, and rightly so. But who does he blame? Not himself, oh no, he blames the poor captain who defended him, and kills the captains daughter and her fiance! Also all you people supporting this guy, check out his relationships with women and family members!! He is a NARCISSIST (read sociopath) "Curious" is right he should have never passed his psych evaluation in the first place. Narcissists/Sociopaths NEVER get better. I hate to say this, but lets all hope that he takes himself out before he hurts anyone else. He is a real and present danger to anyone who gets in his way.
Comment Profile ImageResident #1
Comment #20 | Saturday, Feb 9, 2013 at 2:27 pm
You've got the timeline and circumstances nailed down, Pessimistic.

Thanks for taking the time to lay it out so concisely and in detail.
Comment Profile ImageEx LA resident
Comment #21 | Saturday, Feb 9, 2013 at 7:56 pm
I agree with pessimistic's analysis. I have some experience with LA civil service operations. As stupid as it sounds, I bet you are correct about them allowing somebody untrained and untested to complete probation. I've have seen LA civil service reverse many discipline actions that shouldn't have been reversed. It sure sounds to me that Dorner must have been guilty as charged.
So what are your thoughts on the LAPD shooting the two women? Is it possible they learned that trick as part of the LAPD's "Don't Ever Profile" training? Wouldn't surprise me if the taxpayers pay for this big time and the cops walk away with a pat on the back.
Comment Profile ImageMe
Comment #22 | Saturday, Feb 9, 2013 at 8:40 pm
I started to write my opinion...but after reading Pessimistic's....there's not much more to add. He's 100% on the money.
Comment Profile Imageupset
Comment #23 | Sunday, Feb 10, 2013 at 11:12 pm
All it takes is a POP,POP to head for that idot!!
Comment Profile Imageobserver
Comment #24 | Monday, Feb 11, 2013 at 8:38 am
really don't care about his 'manifesto'. he killed several innocent people, including the Riverside Sheriff that wasn't even part of his 'manifesto'. The guy is a nutjob. What I do care about however, is that the LAPD and others need to be more mindful of handling situations like this so as to not put the public in jeapordy. The rest of us are innocent of his ramblings and murders and do not need to be, shot at, rammed into, and other such nonsense in their efforts to locate this nutjob. Fortunately no one has been killed in their efforts to 'catch' him. No doubt the tactics they are using are not making them look any better. I seriously doubt this guy will make it to trial - COPS will take care of it street justice ..or so it appears that is their agenda.
Comment Continued : The comment above was written from the same location.
Post Continued
Comment Profile Imageobserver
Comment #25 | Monday, Feb 11, 2013 at 8:39 am
Lord help the rest of us if we happen to be nearby..............
Comment Profile ImagePreston
Comment #26 | Monday, Feb 11, 2013 at 9:25 am
They need to capture him alive and put an end to speculation. If they don't there will be even more unanswered questions that will lead to more wild accusations.
It's a shame we cant take this kind of action to track down all vicious criminals.
Comment Profile Imageheads in the sand
Comment #27 | Monday, Feb 11, 2013 at 11:26 am
All you people saying he didn't snap that he was a mental before. "Pink" and others. You know who you are. Here is a fact for you. www.buzzfeed.com/ellievhall/lapd-killer-found-8000-and-returned-it-to-an-oklahoma-church

The guy snapped out at an injustice against him. They ruined him completely. Does it make it right, what he's doing? No, of course not. They pushed the guy over the edge and created a monster. He was more then a normal human being before all this. He was an outstanding human. Now he is a lost crazed individual with vengeance on his mind. You people are so full of yourselves. You wouldn't know the truth, if it slapped you across the face.
Comment Profile ImageCheck it out
Comment #28 | Monday, Feb 11, 2013 at 3:43 pm
Well someone has their head in the sand but it isn't Pink, Pessimistic or any of the other contributors who have commented on this cowardly fugitive being a nut job long before this incident happened. He was on the job ONLY 4 months before he was fired. How can you possibly say that his livelihood was taken away? Get real! How old was he anyway, about 29? It was his own fault that he was fired, he LIED about his supervisor, it was proven he lied. He lied to get "even" with her for giving him a bad review. Getting even with people appears to be his M.O. Pink is right he is a narcissistic/sociopath! Nobody pushed him over the edge, he was over the edge to begin with! The people of Los Angeles were lucky he was let go, can you imagine him as a cop with a gun? Seriously? It is typical of so many people now days, they blame everybody for their problems except the man in the mirror. You might want to think about that Comment 27.

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